THE MONTESSORI ENVIRONMENT–ALL OF IT

“The child should live in an environment of beauty”

Dr. Maria Montessori

We know that in Montessori, the child’s environment should be inviting and one of beauty. It should have real materials, as the child is deserving of this along with order and freedom. What some of us may forget, is that the child’s environment extends past the shelves, areas, and bedroom. Their environment includes their living area in general and the surfaces above where they reach. Having their shelves organized and lovely is wonderful, but the rest of the home should be just as organized and lovely (keeping in mind that these look differently for everyone).

Hubby and I each had well-supplied households before we married. So when we combined our possessions, we discovered that we had a lot. While there were a lot of items we were able to part with initially, like duplicates, there was still much that lingered.

As the girls grew and started to reach higher areas and pay more attention to items, we started to realize that our home was a little too much. That led to the realization that we needed to do a proper go-through and rid ourselves of items that we no longer had a use for–or rather be rid of everything that didn’t have a purpose, meaning, or is beloved. Hubby is pretty good at keeping his materials to a minimum, so it was mostly me who needed to do the purging. I am sentimental, which can make getting rid of certain items more difficult.

I love the look of minimal homes with the white or light neutral colours, it’s so appealing. I tried minimalism, but it’s not me. I love to be surrounded by items that bring me joy and hold so many memories. I love feeling like I’m encircled and being hugged by my rooms. Nice and cozy.

But does my sentimental nature mean that I am exempt from preparing a wonderful environment for E and V? No. It just means our environment may look a little different than some others, and that’s okay. I’m sure your child’s environment looks different than ours, but as long as our children’s needs are being met, it’s all wonderful.

I find myself regularly going through parts of the house to ensure that items have a place, are in their spot, or if they are even needed anymore. This isn’t just for “beauty” but to help me be a prepared adult. One particular spot I do monthly, if not more, is the pantry. This keeps the area organized so that I am aware of what we have, what needs to be used, and what needs to be replaced/filled–all of which help with weekly meal planning and thus my all-around energy and mental well-being.

This is just one of the ways I see Montessori expand past what it does for the child.

How do you find Montessori has benefited you as an adult?

“The things he sees are not just remembered; they form a part of his soul.”

Dr. Maria Montessori

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